Indian Banking System

      Indian Banking System
The Indian financial system comprises a large number of commercial and cooperative banks, specialized developmental banks for industry, agriculture, external trade and housing, social security institutions, collective investment institutions, etc. The banking system is at the heart of the financial system.The Indian banking system has the RBI at the apex. It is the central bank of the country under which there are the commercial banks including public sector and private sector banks, foreign banks and local area banks. It also includes regional rural banks as well as cooperative banks.
India has an extensive banking network. The banking system in India has four tiers

1. Scheduled commercial banks: A scheduled bank in India refers to the bank which is listed in the second schedule of the reserve bank of India act, 1934. Scheduled banks are usually private sector banks, foreign banks and nationalized banks operating in India.

2. Regional rural banks:
 These banks are also called Gramin banks. These are Indian scheduled banks operating in rural areas. These banks were created to provide basic banking and financial services in rural areas. However, their areas of operation include urban areas as well.

3. Co-operative banks: These banks mainly lend to small business groups and provide finance to the agriculture sector. They are located in rural, urban and semi-urban areas. These banks are aimed only at providing basic banking services.

4. Payment banks and small finance banks: These are newly modelled small finance banks conceptualized by the RBI. There are 11 payment banks and 10 small finance banks that operate in India. These are new age banks that are aimed at strengthening the existing channel of APY distribution and provides a boost to the outreach of subscribers under APY.

The different types of banks in India are as follows:

⦁ Commercial banks:
 Commercial banks are the profit making institutions and are one of the most important types of banks. They collect deposits from the public and lend money to business firms, traders, farmers and consumers. Commercial banks meet the working capital needs of trade and industry and are a part of the money market.

⦁ Development banks: They are specialized financial institutions which supply long-term finance to large and medium industries. They also perform various promotional activities for accelerating the rate of capital formation in the country. These banks promote industrial and economic development.

⦁ Co-operative banks: The co-operative banks are aimed at providing credit to primary agriculture credit societies at lower interest rates.

⦁ Land development banks: These banks mainly fund the agricultural sector and provide long term credit to farmers for land development or for acquiring new land.Investment banks: When a corporate entity wants to issue new equity or debt securities, an investment bank serves the role of an intermediary. Sometimes an investment is made in these companies through purchase of equity shares.

⦁ Merchant banks: A merchant bank helps a company sell its new shares in the stock market to the general public and help raise funds for the company.
⦁ Foreign banks: As the name suggests these are non-Indian banks. A foreign bank is obligated to follow the regulations of both the home country and the host-country. Currently there are 45 foreign banks operating in India.

⦁ Central banks: The RBI acts as the central regulatory bank of India. It controls the entire banking system of the country.

⦁ RBI: The reserve bank supervises, control and regulates the activity of the banking sector. The Reserve Bank of India is the currency issuing authority of the country. The main functions of the RBI are given below:
⦁ Welfare of the public
⦁ To maintain the financial stability of the country.
⦁ To execute the financial transactions safely and effectively.
⦁ To develop the financial infrastructure of the country.
⦁ To allocate the funds effectively without any partiality

⦁ Scheduled commercial bank:
 Among the banks, the commercial banks are one of the oldest in the country. There are two sub types of commercial banks based on ownership and control over management. They are:

⦁ Public sector banks: The public sector banks are where the government owns either 50% or more stake. Currently there are 27 commercial public sector banks operating in India.

⦁ Private sector banks: The private sector banks are where the majority of stake is held by the share holders of the bank. Currently there are 15 private sector banks operating in India.

The bank refers to the banks which are not listed in the second schedule of the RBI. The banks are required to maintain cash reserve requirements not with RBI but with themselves. There are only 4 non-scheduled commercial banks operating in India.

⦁ Foreign banks: the foreign banks obtain a license from RBI to operate in India. These banks besides financing foreign trade of the country, undertake normal banking business as well. Currently there are 45 foreign banks operating in India.

⦁ Co-operative banks: These banks are government sponsored, government supported and government subsidized financial agencies in India. Unlike commercial banks which focus on profits, cooperative banks are organized and managed on principles of cooperation, self help and mutual help.

⦁ Regional rural banks: The regional rural banks carry out the normal banking functions in rural areas and are primarily focussed on granting loans and advances to small/marginal farmers, agricultural farmers and labourers.

 Classification of banks in India

Indian banking system can be classified as:

Organized banking:  The institutions which are controlled by the central bank of the country namely RBI, SEBI, IRDA are called institutional or organized. Organized sector is classified into two categories namely – banking institutions and non-banking financial institutions. The following institutions are under the purview of organized sector:
⦁ Small Industries Development Bank of India
⦁ National Bank for Agriculture and Rural Development
⦁ National Housing Bank
⦁ Export-Import Bank of India (EXIM Bank).

Unorganised banking: In the case of the Indian Banking System, indigenous bankers are included in the unorganized sector. Indigenous bankers include those individuals and banks that accept deposits or depend on credit to run their business. They deal with short-term credit instruments for the purpose of providing financial help. The rate of interest charged fluctuates directly with the amount and time period. They are the major sources of funds for small borrowers on account of simple documentation and funds are made available to the borrowers at any time during a day.
                               How Banks Earn their Money

Banks are businesses: they need to make money and they do this in a number of different ways.

Commercial and retails banks raise funds by lending money at a higher rate of interest than they borrow it. This money is borrowed from other banks or from customers who deposit money with them. They also charge customers fees for services to do with managing their accounts, and earn money from bank charges levied on overdrafts which exceed agreed limits.
Investment banks earn fees from providing advice to large organisations coming to the City to issue stocks and shares, and for underwriting these issues, as well as trading securities on the financial markets.

 Main points about how Banks Earn Money :

⦁ Banks are companies (normally listed on the stock market) and are therefore owned by, and run for, their shareholders. Banks need to make enough money to pay their employees, maintain the buildings and run the business.

⦁ There are three main ways banks make money. By charging fees for services they provide and by trading financial instruments in the financial markets.

⦁ Retail and commercial banks need lots of customers to deposit their money with them, as the banks use these deposits to earn enough money to stay in business.

⦁ To encourage people to keep their money in a bank, the bank will pay them a small amount of money (interest). This interest is paid from the money the bank earns by lending out the deposited money to other customers.

⦁ Banks also lend to each other on a huge scale. Most of this lending is on a short-term basis, usually no longer than three months, often just overnight.

⦁ If a bank has a surplus of liquid (available) assets then the bank can make money by lending these assets to other banks in the interbank market. As money flows in and out, banks will both lend and borrow money on the interbank market as needs require.

⦁ The banks lend money to customers at a higher rate than they pay to depositors or than they borrow it. The difference, known as the margin or turn, is kept by the bank. For example, if a bank pays 1% interest on deposits, they may charge 6% interest on loans.

⦁ Lending takes the form of overdrafts, bank loans, mortgages (loans secured on property) and credit card facilities. The bank will work out the cost of making the funds available to the borrower and add a profit margin.

⦁ Loans approved by banks will vary in size, and may have fixed or variable interest rates but, in all cases, the bank will lend the money to the customer at a higher rate than they borrow it.

⦁ Deposits are the banks' liabilities. If everyone was to demand their money back at once, the bank would not be able to pay. Because they lend money out, banks are required to carry a cushion of capital so they have sufficient money to pay those customers likely to withdraw their money at any time.

⦁ Another way banks make money is through charging fees. Most retail and commercial banks will charge for specific services, for example, for processing cheques, for other transactions and for unauthorised borrowing e.g. if a client exceeds an overdraft limit.

⦁ Investment banks earn huge fees for advising large companies and public institutions on issuing bonds and shares (securities), and from underwriting these issues.

⦁ Investment banks charge fees for advising clients wanting to bid for other companies in mergers and acquisitions, or management buy-outs. These deals can be very complex and provide an important source of income as well as an opportunity to underwrite shares related to these deals.

⦁ Investment banks also make their money by trading securities in the secondary markets. Their aim is to sell these securities for more than they pay for them or purchase them for less than they sold them. The difference, called the turn, is kept by the bank. 

⦁ Banks also buy and sell currencies of all the nations of the world, trying to take advantage of the different prices of these currencies against each other, which are changing all the time.

Aditi Shukla  MBA(finance)
Intern
Aircrew Aviation Private Limited


Indisches Bankensystem

Das indische Finanzsystem besteht aus einer Vielzahl von Handels- und Genossenschaftsbanken, spezialisierten Entwicklungsbanken für Industrie, Landwirtschaft, Außenhandel und Wohnungswesen, Sozialversicherungsträgern, kollektiven Kapitalanlagen usw. Das Bankensystem ist das Herzstück des Finanzsystems Das indische Bankensystem hat die RBI an der Spitze. Es ist die Zentralbank des Landes, unter der sich die Geschäftsbanken befinden, darunter Banken des öffentlichen und des privaten Sektors, ausländische Banken und lokale Banken. Dazu gehören auch regionale ländliche Banken sowie Genossenschaftsbanken.

Indien verfügt über ein umfangreiches Bankennetz. Das Bankensystem in Indien hat vier Ebenen



1. Geplante Geschäftsbanken: Eine geplante Bank in Indien bezieht sich auf die Bank, die im zweiten Plan des Gesetzes über die Reserve Bank of India von 1934 aufgeführt ist. Geplante Banken sind in der Regel Banken des privaten Sektors, ausländische Banken und verstaatlichte Banken, die in Indien tätig sind.


2. Regionale ländliche Banken: Diese Banken werden auch Graminbanken genannt. Dies sind indische Linienbanken, die in ländlichen Gebieten tätig sind. Diese Banken wurden geschaffen, um grundlegende Bank- und Finanzdienstleistungen in ländlichen Gebieten zu erbringen. Zu ihren Einsatzgebieten zählen jedoch auch städtische Gebiete.



3. Genossenschaftsbanken: Diese Banken vergeben Kredite hauptsächlich an kleine Unternehmensgruppen und finanzieren den Agrarsektor. Sie befinden sich in ländlichen, städtischen und halbstädtischen Gebieten. Diese Banken sind nur auf die Erbringung grundlegender Bankdienstleistungen ausgerichtet.



4. Zahlungsbanken und kleine Finanzbanken: Hierbei handelt es sich um neu modellierte kleine Finanzbanken, die von der RBI konzipiert wurden. Es gibt 11 Zahlungsbanken und 10 kleine Finanzbanken, die in Indien tätig sind. Hierbei handelt es sich um New-Age-Banken, die darauf abzielen, den bestehenden Vertriebskanal für APY zu stärken und die Reichweite der APY-Abonnenten zu erhöhen.



Die verschiedenen Arten von Banken in Indien sind wie folgt:


⦁ Geschäftsbanken: Geschäftsbanken sind die gewinnbringenden Institute und gehören zu den wichtigsten Bankentypen. Sie sammeln öffentliche Einlagen und verleihen Geld an Unternehmen, Händler, Landwirte und Verbraucher. Geschäftsbanken decken den Bedarf an Betriebskapital von Handel und Industrie und sind Teil des Geldmarktes.



⦁ Entwicklungsbanken: Sie sind spezialisierte Finanzinstitute, die große und mittlere Unternehmen mit langfristigen Finanzierungen versorgen. Sie führen auch verschiedene Werbemaßnahmen zur Beschleunigung der Kapitalbildung im Land durch. Diese Banken fördern die industrielle und wirtschaftliche Entwicklung.



⦁ Genossenschaftsbanken: Ziel der Genossenschaftsbanken ist es, zinsgünstigere Kredite für landwirtschaftliche Primärkreditgesellschaften bereitzustellen.



⦁ Landentwicklungsbanken: Diese Banken finanzieren hauptsächlich den Agrarsektor und gewähren Landwirten langfristige Kredite für die Landentwicklung oder den Erwerb von neuem Land. Investmentbanken: Wenn ein Unternehmen neue Eigenkapital- oder Schuldtitel ausgeben möchte, übernimmt eine Investmentbank die Rolle eines Vermittlers. Manchmal wird eine Investition in diese Unternehmen durch den Kauf von Aktien getätigt.



⦁ Händlerbanken: Eine Händlerbank hilft einem Unternehmen, seine neuen Aktien an der Börse an die breite Öffentlichkeit zu verkaufen und Spenden für das Unternehmen zu sammeln.

⦁ Ausländische Banken: Wie der Name schon sagt, handelt es sich um nicht-indische Banken. Eine ausländische Bank ist verpflichtet, die Vorschriften sowohl des Heimatlandes als auch des Gastlandes einzuhalten. Derzeit sind 45 ausländische Banken in Indien tätig.



⦁ Zentralbanken: Die RBI fungiert als indische Zentralbank. Es kontrolliert das gesamte Bankensystem des Landes.



⦁ RBI: Die Reservebank überwacht, kontrolliert und reguliert die Tätigkeit des Bankensektors. Die Reserve Bank of India ist die Währung ausstellende Behörde des Landes. Die Hauptfunktionen des RBI sind nachfolgend aufgeführt:

⦁ Wohl der Öffentlichkeit

⦁ Zur Wahrung der finanziellen Stabilität des Landes.

⦁ Um die Finanztransaktionen sicher und effektiv auszuführen.

⦁ Entwicklung der Finanzinfrastruktur des Landes.

⦁ Die Mittel effektiv und ohne Befangenheit zuzuteilen


⦁ Geplante Geschäftsbank: Unter den Banken gehören die Geschäftsbanken zu den ältesten des Landes. Es gibt zwei Untertypen von Geschäftsbanken, die auf Eigentum und Kontrolle über das Management beruhen. Sie sind:



⦁ Banken des öffentlichen Sektors: Bei den Banken des öffentlichen Sektors ist der Staat zu mindestens 50% beteiligt. Derzeit sind in Indien 27 öffentliche Geschäftsbanken tätig.



⦁ Privatbanken: In den Privatbanken halten die Anteilseigner der Bank die Mehrheit der Anteile. Derzeit sind in Indien 15 Privatbanken tätig.



Die Bank bezieht sich auf die Banken, die nicht im zweiten Zeitplan der RBI aufgeführt sind. Die Banken sind verpflichtet, die Liquiditätsreserven nicht bei der RBI, sondern bei sich selbst zu halten. In Indien gibt es nur 4 nicht planmäßige Geschäftsbanken.




⦁ Ausländische Banken: Die ausländischen Banken erhalten von der RBI eine Lizenz für den Betrieb in Indien. Diese Banken neben finan


Sistema bancario indio

El sistema financiero de la India comprende un gran número de bancos comerciales y cooperativos, bancos especializados en desarrollo para la industria, agricultura, comercio exterior y vivienda, instituciones de seguridad social, instituciones de inversión colectiva, etc. El sistema bancario está en el corazón del sistema financiero. El sistema bancario indio tiene el RBI en el ápice. Es el banco central del país en el que se encuentran los bancos comerciales, incluidos los bancos del sector público y privado, los bancos extranjeros y los bancos de área local. También incluye bancos rurales regionales, así como bancos cooperativos.

India tiene una extensa red bancaria. El sistema bancario en la India tiene cuatro niveles



1. Bancos comerciales programados: un banco programado en India se refiere al banco que figura en el segundo programa de la ley de bancos de reserva de India, 1934. Los bancos programados son generalmente bancos del sector privado, bancos extranjeros y bancos nacionalizados que operan en India.


2. Bancos rurales regionales: estos bancos también se llaman bancos Gramin. Estos son bancos indios programados que operan en áreas rurales. Estos bancos fueron creados para proporcionar servicios bancarios y financieros básicos en áreas rurales. Sin embargo, sus áreas de operación incluyen áreas urbanas también.



3. Bancos cooperativos: estos bancos prestan principalmente a grupos de pequeñas empresas y proporcionan financiamiento al sector agrícola. Se ubican en zonas rurales, urbanas y semiurbanas. Estos bancos están destinados únicamente a prestar servicios bancarios básicos.



4. Bancos de pago y bancos pequeños de financiamiento: estos son bancos de financiamiento pequeño recientemente modelados conceptualizados por el RBI. Hay 11 bancos de pago y 10 bancos pequeños que operan en la India. Estos son bancos de la nueva era que tienen como objetivo fortalecer el canal existente de distribución de APY y brindan un impulso al alcance de los suscriptores bajo APY.



Los diferentes tipos de bancos en la India son los siguientes:


Banks Bancos comerciales: los bancos comerciales son las instituciones con fines de lucro y son uno de los tipos de bancos más importantes. Recogen depósitos del público y prestan dinero a empresas comerciales, comerciantes, agricultores y consumidores. Los bancos comerciales satisfacen las necesidades de capital de trabajo del comercio y la industria y forman parte del mercado monetario.



Banks Bancos de desarrollo: son instituciones financieras especializadas que proporcionan financiamiento a largo plazo a industrias grandes y medianas. También realizan diversas actividades de promoción para acelerar la tasa de formación de capital en el país. Estos bancos promueven el desarrollo industrial y económico.



Banks Bancos cooperativos: los bancos cooperativos tienen como objetivo proporcionar crédito a las sociedades de crédito de la agricultura primaria a tasas de interés más bajas.



Banks Bancos de desarrollo de tierras: estos bancos financian principalmente el sector agrícola y otorgan crédito a largo plazo a los agricultores para el desarrollo de tierras o para la adquisición de nuevas tierras. Bancos de inversiones: cuando una entidad corporativa desea emitir nuevos valores de acciones o deuda, un banco de inversiones cumple la función de un intermediario. A veces se realiza una inversión en estas empresas mediante la compra de acciones de capital.



Banks Bancos comerciales: un banco mercantil ayuda a una empresa a vender sus nuevas acciones en el mercado de valores al público en general y ayuda a recaudar fondos para la empresa.

Banks Bancos extranjeros: como su nombre indica, estos son bancos no indígenas. Un banco extranjero está obligado a seguir las regulaciones tanto del país de origen como del país anfitrión. Actualmente hay 45 bancos extranjeros que operan en la India.



Banks Bancos centrales: el RBI actúa como el banco regulador central de la India. Controla todo el sistema bancario del país.



⦁ RBI: El banco de reserva supervisa, controla y regula la actividad del sector bancario. El Banco de Reserva de la India es la autoridad emisora ​​de divisas del país. Las principales funciones del RBI se detallan a continuación:

⦁ Bienestar del público.

⦁ Mantener la estabilidad financiera del país.

⦁ Ejecutar las transacciones financieras de forma segura y efectiva.

⦁ Desarrollar la infraestructura financiera del país.

⦁ Asignar los fondos efectivamente sin ninguna parcialidad.


Bank Banco comercial programado: entre los bancos, los bancos comerciales son uno de los más antiguos del país. Hay dos subtipos de bancos comerciales basados ​​en la propiedad y el control sobre la administración. Son:



Banks Bancos del sector público: los bancos del sector público son donde el gobierno posee una participación del 50% o más. Actualmente hay 27 bancos comerciales del sector público que operan en la India.



Banks Bancos del sector privado: los bancos del sector privado son donde la mayoría de la participación está en manos de los accionistas del banco. Actualmente hay 15 bancos del sector privado que operan en la India.



El banco se refiere a los bancos que no están listados en el segundo programa del RBI. Los bancos deben mantener los requisitos de reserva de efectivo no con RBI sino con ellos mismos. Solo hay 4 bancos comerciales no programados que operan en la India.




Banks Bancos extranjeros: los bancos extranjeros obtienen una licencia del RBI para operar en la India. Estos bancos ademas de finan
Système bancaire indien

Le système financier indien comprend un grand nombre de banques commerciales et coopératives, de banques de développement spécialisées pour l'industrie, l'agriculture, le commerce extérieur et le logement, des organismes de sécurité sociale, des organismes de placement collectif, etc. Le système bancaire est au cœur du système financier. Le système bancaire indien a la RBI au sommet. C’est la banque centrale du pays dans lequel se trouvent les banques commerciales, y compris les banques des secteurs public et privé, les banques étrangères et les banques locales. Il comprend également les banques rurales régionales ainsi que les banques coopératives.

L'Inde dispose d'un vaste réseau bancaire. Le système bancaire en Inde a quatre niveaux



1. Banques commerciales planifiées: une banque programmée en Inde fait référence à la banque qui figure dans la deuxième annexe de la loi de 1934 sur la banque de réserve de l'Inde. Les banques planifiées sont généralement des banques du secteur privé, des banques étrangères et des banques nationalisées opérant en Inde.


2. Les banques rurales régionales: Ces banques sont également appelées banques Gramin. Ce sont des banques indiennes installées dans des zones rurales. Ces banques ont été créées pour fournir des services bancaires et financiers de base dans les zones rurales. Cependant, leurs zones d'intervention incluent également les zones urbaines.



3. Banques coopératives: ces banques prêtent principalement à des groupes de petites entreprises et financent le secteur agricole. Ils sont situés dans des zones rurales, urbaines et semi-urbaines. Ces banques ne visent qu'à fournir des services bancaires de base.



4. Banques de paiement et petites banques de financement: Il s'agit de petites banques de financement nouvellement modélisées et conceptualisées par la RBI. Il existe 11 banques de paiement et 10 petites banques de financement en Inde. Ces banques du nouvel âge ont pour objectif de renforcer le canal de distribution APY existant et de dynamiser la portée des abonnés sous APY.



Les différents types de banques en Inde sont les suivants:


Banks Banques commerciales: les banques commerciales sont les institutions à but lucratif et sont l’un des types de banques les plus importants. Ils collectent des dépôts auprès du public et prêtent de l'argent à des entreprises, des commerçants, des agriculteurs et des consommateurs. Les banques commerciales répondent aux besoins en fonds de roulement du commerce et de l'industrie et font partie du marché monétaire.



Banks Les banques de développement: ce sont des institutions financières spécialisées qui fournissent des financements à long terme aux grandes et moyennes industries. Ils exercent également diverses activités promotionnelles pour accélérer le rythme de formation de capital dans le pays. Ces banques favorisent le développement industriel et économique.



Banks Banques coopératives: les banques coopératives ont pour objectif de fournir des crédits aux sociétés de crédit au secteur de l’agriculture primaire à des taux d’intérêt plus bas.



Banks Banques d'aménagement du territoire: ces banques financent principalement le secteur agricole et accordent aux agriculteurs un crédit à long terme pour l'aménagement du territoire ou l'acquisition de nouvelles terres. d'un intermédiaire. Parfois, ces sociétés investissent dans l’achat d’actions.



⦁ Les banques d'affaires: une banque d'affaires aide une entreprise à vendre ses nouvelles actions boursières au grand public et à lever des fonds pour l'entreprise.

Banks Banques étrangères: comme leur nom l'indique, il s'agit de banques non indiennes. Une banque étrangère est obligée de respecter les réglementations du pays d'origine et du pays d'accueil. Il existe actuellement 45 banques étrangères opérant en Inde.



Banks Banques centrales: la RBI agit en tant que banque de régulation centrale de l'Inde. Il contrôle tout le système bancaire du pays.



⦁ RBI: la banque de réserve supervise, contrôle et réglemente l'activité du secteur bancaire. La Reserve Bank of India est l'autorité émettrice de la monnaie du pays. Les principales fonctions de la RBI sont indiquées ci-dessous:

⦁ Bien-être du public

Maintenir la stabilité financière du pays.

Exécuter les transactions financières de manière sûre et efficace.

Développer l'infrastructure financière du pays.

Allouer les fonds efficacement sans aucune partialité


⦁ Banque commerciale planifiée: parmi les banques, les banques commerciales sont parmi les plus anciennes du pays. Il existe deux sous-types de banques commerciales basées sur la propriété et le contrôle de la gestion. Elles sont:



Banks Banques du secteur public: les banques du secteur public sont celles dans lesquelles le gouvernement détient une participation de 50% ou plus. Il existe actuellement 27 banques du secteur public commercial en Inde.



Banks Banques du secteur privé: les banques du secteur privé sont celles où la majorité des parts est détenue par les actionnaires de la banque. Il existe actuellement 15 banques du secteur privé en Inde.



La banque fait référence aux banques qui ne figurent pas dans la deuxième annexe de la RBI. Les banques sont tenues de respecter les exigences en matière de réserves de trésorerie non pas avec RBI mais avec elles-mêmes. Il n'y a que 4 banques commerciales non programmées opérant en Inde.




Banks Banques étrangères: les banques étrangères obtiennent une licence de RBI pour opérer en Inde. Ces banques en plus du finan


Indisches Bankensystem

Das indische Finanzsystem besteht aus einer Vielzahl von Handels- und Genossenschaftsbanken, spezialisierten Entwicklungsbanken für Industrie, Landwirtschaft, Außenhandel und Wohnungswesen, Sozialversicherungsträgern, kollektiven Kapitalanlagen usw. Das Bankensystem ist das Herzstück des Finanzsystems Das indische Bankensystem hat die RBI an der Spitze. Es ist die Zentralbank des Landes, unter der sich die Geschäftsbanken befinden, darunter Banken des öffentlichen und des privaten Sektors, ausländische Banken und lokale Banken. Dazu gehören auch regionale ländliche Banken sowie Genossenschaftsbanken.

Indien verfügt über ein umfangreiches Bankennetz. Das Bankensystem in Indien hat vier Ebenen



1. Geplante Geschäftsbanken: Eine geplante Bank in Indien bezieht sich auf die Bank, die im zweiten Plan des Gesetzes über die Reserve Bank of India von 1934 aufgeführt ist. Geplante Banken sind in der Regel Banken des privaten Sektors, ausländische Banken und verstaatlichte Banken, die in Indien tätig sind.


2. Regionale ländliche Banken: Diese Banken werden auch Graminbanken genannt. Dies sind indische Linienbanken, die in ländlichen Gebieten tätig sind. Diese Banken wurden geschaffen, um grundlegende Bank- und Finanzdienstleistungen in ländlichen Gebieten zu erbringen. Zu ihren Einsatzgebieten zählen jedoch auch städtische Gebiete.



3. Genossenschaftsbanken: Diese Banken vergeben Kredite hauptsächlich an kleine Unternehmensgruppen und finanzieren den Agrarsektor. Sie befinden sich in ländlichen, städtischen und halbstädtischen Gebieten. Diese Banken sind nur auf die Erbringung grundlegender Bankdienstleistungen ausgerichtet.



4. Zahlungsbanken und kleine Finanzbanken: Hierbei handelt es sich um neu modellierte kleine Finanzbanken, die von der RBI konzipiert wurden. Es gibt 11 Zahlungsbanken und 10 kleine Finanzbanken, die in Indien tätig sind. Hierbei handelt es sich um New-Age-Banken, die darauf abzielen, den bestehenden Vertriebskanal für APY zu stärken und die Reichweite der APY-Abonnenten zu erhöhen.



Die verschiedenen Arten von Banken in Indien sind wie folgt:


⦁ Geschäftsbanken: Geschäftsbanken sind die gewinnbringenden Institute und gehören zu den wichtigsten Bankentypen. Sie sammeln öffentliche Einlagen und verleihen Geld an Unternehmen, Händler, Landwirte und Verbraucher. Geschäftsbanken decken den Bedarf an Betriebskapital von Handel und Industrie und sind Teil des Geldmarktes.



⦁ Entwicklungsbanken: Sie sind spezialisierte Finanzinstitute, die große und mittlere Unternehmen mit langfristigen Finanzierungen versorgen. Sie führen auch verschiedene Werbemaßnahmen zur Beschleunigung der Kapitalbildung im Land durch. Diese Banken fördern die industrielle und wirtschaftliche Entwicklung.



⦁ Genossenschaftsbanken: Ziel der Genossenschaftsbanken ist es, zinsgünstigere Kredite für landwirtschaftliche Primärkreditgesellschaften bereitzustellen.



⦁ Landentwicklungsbanken: Diese Banken finanzieren hauptsächlich den Agrarsektor und gewähren Landwirten langfristige Kredite für die Landentwicklung oder den Erwerb von neuem Land. Investmentbanken: Wenn ein Unternehmen neue Eigenkapital- oder Schuldtitel ausgeben möchte, übernimmt eine Investmentbank die Rolle eines Vermittlers. Manchmal wird eine Investition in diese Unternehmen durch den Kauf von Aktien getätigt.



⦁ Händlerbanken: Eine Händlerbank hilft einem Unternehmen, seine neuen Aktien an der Börse an die breite Öffentlichkeit zu verkaufen und Spenden für das Unternehmen zu sammeln.

⦁ Ausländische Banken: Wie der Name schon sagt, handelt es sich um nicht-indische Banken. Eine ausländische Bank ist verpflichtet, die Vorschriften sowohl des Heimatlandes als auch des Gastlandes einzuhalten. Derzeit sind 45 ausländische Banken in Indien tätig.



⦁ Zentralbanken: Die RBI fungiert als indische Zentralbank. Es kontrolliert das gesamte Bankensystem des Landes.



⦁ RBI: Die Reservebank überwacht, kontrolliert und reguliert die Tätigkeit des Bankensektors. Die Reserve Bank of India ist die Währung ausstellende Behörde des Landes. Die Hauptfunktionen des RBI sind nachfolgend aufgeführt:

⦁ Wohl der Öffentlichkeit

⦁ Zur Wahrung der finanziellen Stabilität des Landes.

⦁ Um die Finanztransaktionen sicher und effektiv auszuführen.

⦁ Entwicklung der Finanzinfrastruktur des Landes.

⦁ Die Mittel effektiv und ohne Befangenheit zuzuteilen


⦁ Geplante Geschäftsbank: Unter den Banken gehören die Geschäftsbanken zu den ältesten des Landes. Es gibt zwei Untertypen von Geschäftsbanken, die auf Eigentum und Kontrolle über das Management beruhen. Sie sind:



⦁ Banken des öffentlichen Sektors: Bei den Banken des öffentlichen Sektors ist der Staat zu mindestens 50% beteiligt. Derzeit sind in Indien 27 öffentliche Geschäftsbanken tätig.



⦁ Privatbanken: In den Privatbanken halten die Anteilseigner der Bank die Mehrheit der Anteile. Derzeit sind in Indien 15 Privatbanken tätig.



Die Bank bezieht sich auf die Banken, die nicht im zweiten Zeitplan der RBI aufgeführt sind. Die Banken sind verpflichtet, die Liquiditätsreserven nicht bei der RBI, sondern bei sich selbst zu halten. In Indien gibt es nur 4 nicht planmäßige Geschäftsbanken.




⦁ Ausländische Banken: Die ausländischen Banken erhalten von der RBI eine Lizenz für den Betrieb in Indien. Diese Banken neben finan

Comments